Tree Swallows

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Not all of the birds hanging out in the marshland near Killbuck are aquatic.  As spring approaches, the marsh always has swarms of little birds, swooping around, eating invisible insects.  They seemed to be perching on some dead trees pretty far out in the water, so I couldn’t get a good look at them, but I came back on March 26, and found some that were within telephoto range of the pickup truck.

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They turn out to be Tree Swallows. Once I found a place in range of a sunlit roost, I parked the pickup, and propped the telephoto on the open window to watch.  Appearing mostly black in flight, I hadn’t appreciated how brilliant iridescent blue they  are.  The first one landed on the branch, spent some time resting, and then checked out the knothole, which is their favorite natural nesting site.  If I understand the lifecycle correctly, unlike ducks and geese, the males and female migrate separately, with the males arriving in the breeding grounds before the female, so the male can choose a nesting site. 

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A little bit later, a second swallow arrived. Both were brilliant blue, as were all the ones I could see, so either the brown females hadn’t arrived yet, or they were just shy around photographers.   I’m guessing that the females were still in an outlet mall in North Carolina.

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The first male seemed pretty attached to his knot hole, and it wasn’t at all apparent to me if there actually were enough knot holes to go around.  The originally swallow didn’t seem too keen on sharing a perch, at least not with another male.

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As recorded by my DSLR, they stood on the broken branch and glared and postured at each other for over 6 minutes.

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Finally, the interloper, either bored, frustrated, or hungry flew off.

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After spending some more time exploring his knot hole, the first swallow flew off to get some more of the 2000 bugs he needs every day to keep his wings pumping.  I don’t know how he defends his territory when he’s out slurping up insects.

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